Surfside Sea Glass Gems

Why Genuine Sea Glass Is Special.

Why Genuine Sea Glass Is Special.

Nothing compares to the thrill of finding that special, rare piece of sea glass. For those who collect, I share your love of the endless quest for that elusive red, turquoise, yellow, or orange. I also appreciate the heart- flutter that comes with finding even a pretty white or brown. Like you, I imagine the history of every piece found. How old is it? What did it begin its life as? Whose hand held it last? Why was it tossed into the sea? Every color and piece of genuine sea glass has an identity to it.

I thank all of you who respect the uniqueness of natural sea glass and maintain the integrity of it. Years from now, you can look at all your sea glass prizes and know that you did your part to preserve the history and beauty that comes with each piece. There are varying opinions on fake "sea glass". Some say they like the look regardless. Others say they want a color not found often or at all while collecting. I believe that there is beauty in all creativity.

But, genuine sea glass emerges from the waves as is. Fakes strive to be something they are not. They are imitations. They are impersonators of the real thing. They dilute the market, confuse the buyer, and devalue natural sea glass. This problem is only getting worse as time goes on.

So, thank you again all you wonderful sea glass people who share my passion. Please continue to get out on that beach and feel the sun on your face. May your next find be the red you always dreamed of! For more information about genuine sea glass and the pitfalls of fake "sea glass", please feel free to contact me or NASGA. 

How to Tell What's Genuine Sea Glass And What's Fake

How to Tell What's Genuine Sea Glass And What's Fake

ALL of my sea glass is genuine, ocean-tumbled sea glass that I collect off the rocky and sandy shores myself. It is NEVER machine-tumbled. Please pay close attention to pictures and descriptions of sea glass and do not be afraid to ask questions about where the sea glass originates from. When it is too consistent in shape to other pieces, has too many rare colors in similar shapes, has a smoother rather than more pitted patina or its price does not reflect the value of the sea glass, it may be too good to be true. When in doubt, please ask. You are helping to preserve the integrity of the sea glass art by doing so and I along with my colleagues thank you for that.